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Month: October 2018

So and Such | Similarities and Differences

So and Such | Similarities and Differences

So and such have similarities in meaning but they are different in use. We use so with an adjective without a noun. For example: so high, so beautiful, so clever etc. Unlike “so”, such is used before an adjective with a noun. For example : such a high mountain, such a beautiful girl, such a clever boy, etc. Let’s see them in sentences : I like Jack and Sue. They are so nice. I like Jack and Sue. They are such nice people. The Meaning Of So And Such So and such are used to make the meaning of the adjective stronger. They mean really.  So nice means really…

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Mustn’t and Needn’t | the Difference

Mustn’t and Needn’t | the Difference

The word “must” is used to express obligation. However, when we make negative statements related to this word, there are two possibilities. We have to understand the difference between “mustn’t” and “needn’t”. The Difference between Mustn’t and Needn’t You must do means  that it is necessary that you do something. Let’s see the following examples. You haven’t got much time. You must hurry. You can tell John what I said but he must keep it a secret . You mustn’t do means that it is…

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Either and Neither

Either and Neither

Either and neither can be used similarly in a few ways. We use either and neither to agree with someone who expresses negative statements. In addition, we use either and neither to express two alternatives. Either is used to express two positive alternatives while neither is used to express two negative alternatives. For more detailed, check the following sections. Either For Agreement We can use either to agree with someone. We use either to avoid repeating what someone says to us. In this case, the statement must be a negative sentence. Let’s see the following…

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Can Could and Be Able To

Can Could and Be Able To

We use “can, could and be able to” to express ability and possibility. However, we use them in different situation.  We use can  to say that something is possible or that someone has the ability to do something. The negative is can’t (cannot). Let’s see the following examples : You can see the sea from our bedroom window. Can you speak Spanish ? I’m afraid I can’t come your party tomorrow. “Be Able To” Can Replace “Can” Be able to is sometimes used to replace can. Let’s see the…

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Idioms

Idioms

According to  Oxford Languages, Idioms is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words. Therefore, we have provided you with the list of idioms that we should memorize. Idioms List Idioms Meaning Examples in Sentences Above all Mainly, especially He is good at all subjects at school, above all, in Literature. All at once suddenly All day long The entire day, continuously through the day All of a sudden…

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Word Order

Word Order

When we make a sentence in English, we normally follow the following order (word order) Subject + Verb + Object + Adverb Of Place + Adverb Of Time. Let’s see the following example.  Subject  Verb  Object  Manner  Place  Time The boy  studies  English  well  at school  every day.  The maid  cleans  the house  thoroughly  every morning.  John  works  hard  every day.  Mary  will get married to  George  tomorrow. Word Order: Verb + Object The verb and the object of the…

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Direct Indirect Speech

Direct Indirect Speech

In this episode we are going to talk about Direct Indirect Speech. Direct Speech is something or statement that you express directly. Different from Direct Speech, Indirect Speech is something or statement that another person said/expressed. In this case, you reported what they said. So, you are a like reporter. We use indirect speech to tell someone else about what we have already heard from another person. Let’s see the following situation: Direct Speech : George said, “I’m lonely.” If…

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Conditional Sentences Type III

Conditional Sentences Type III

As we know, there are four types of conditional sentences. They are: Zero Conditional Sentences, First Conditional Sentences, Second Conditional Sentences, Third Conditional Sentences.  In this episode, we are going to discuss the Third Conditional Sentences (Conditional Sentences Type III). Pattern of Conditional Sentences Type III Conditional sentences type III have the following pattern : Sub Clause (If Clause /Conditional Clause)  Main Clause  If + Past Perfect Tense If + Subject + had + Verb III  Subject + would +…

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Conditional Sentences Type II Exercise + Answer

Conditional Sentences Type II Exercise + Answer

As we are aware, there are four types of conditional sentences. They are: Zero Conditional Sentences, First Conditional Sentences, Second Conditional Sentences, Third Conditional Sentences.  In this episode, we are going to discuss the Second Conditional Sentences (Conditional Sentences Type II) . Pattern of Conditional Sentences Type II Conditional sentences type II have the following pattern :  Sub Clause (If Clause /Conditional Clause)  Main Clause  If + Past Simple Tense If + Subject + Verb II or If + Subject…

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Conditional Sentences Type I

Conditional Sentences Type I

In this episode we are going to talk about Conditional Sentences Type 1. We usually use it to express possibility when certain condition is fulfilled. Pattern Conditional sentences type I have the following pattern :  Sub Clause ( If Clause /Conditional Clause)  Main Clause If + Present Simple Tense If + Subject + Verb I (s/es) Future Simple Subject + will + Verb I or Subject + Modal Verbs + Verb I or Subject + be going to + Verb…

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